Weeks Seven & Eight

Maybe I can blame it on the heat.  Surely the humidity is high enough around here to stifle whatever creativity is left out.  Could it be that my creative energy is spent on my kiddos, having them home? There’s also a good chance I let myself slip out of my routine. Whatever the case may be, I hit a writing wall in the past couple of weeks and I’m doing my darndest to plow through it… But. It’s. Just. So. HOT.

I am happy to report that we haven’t lost any #100PictureBookSummer steam, even though I did skip last week.  I had a good reason, I promise. I’m going to catch up here, listing weeks seven and eight and reveling in the fact that we are only 20 books away from reaching our summer reading goal!  I’ve included the link to Book Nerd Mommy’s full list below.  I always make a few adjustments but it’s been a wonderful guide for me these past few weeks.  Here’s number 61-80…

http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

  1. Billy and Goat at the State Fair by Dan Yaccarino
  2. Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
  3. Have you Seen Elephant? by David Barros
  4. Louise Loves Art by Kelly Light
  5. The Adventures of Beekle: the Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat
  6. The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
  7. Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova by Laurel Snyder & Julie Morstad
  8. The Summer Nick Taught his Cats to Read by Curtis Manley & Kate Berube
  9. Extra Yarn by Mac Barnette & John Klassen
  10. Hannah Hashimoto Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegake & Qin Leng
  11. If you Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff & Felicia Bond
  12. On the Night You Were Born by Nancy Tillman
  13. The Branch by Pierre Pratt & Mireille Messier
  14. Quackers by Liz Fleming
  15. The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn & Ruth E Harper
  16. I’m Bored by Christine Schneider & Herve Pinel
  17. The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak
  18. The Bear’s Song by Benjamin Chaud
  19. Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs as retold by Mo Willems
  20. In My Heart: a Book of Feelings by Jo Witek & Christine Roussey

Two posts back, I talked a lot about OC.  This week, I’d like to introduce you a little more to MC.  At five years old, he’s proud to have the lightest hair in the family (still brown), wears his heart on his sleeves (both) and does everything in his little life with so much passion.  Don’t mistake the passion for speed though, he’s only in a hurry when he wants to be.  MC’s life is one leisurely stroll through the park, with periodic bursts of energy interspersed with ninja moves and three-hour meals that would make a Parisian antsy. He is my self-proclaimed bodyguard, a fantastic story teller and the most enthusiastic audience you’ll ever meet. I spent most of my life hoping and wishing for a son, he is one helluva an answer to a deeply rooted prayer.

If my journey as a writer has an impact on any of my kids, its MC that I think it will affect the most.  Yes, OC loves to read and has a voracious literary appetite, but unfortunately for her, she reads like her mother… quickly and sometimes the details get lost.  MC has a keen ability to hone in on a story, and soak it in with an attentiveness and understanding that doesn’t come naturally to most kids his age.  He’s also at that magical place of learning to read.  He loves sounding words out and talking about letters.  He’s on the cusp of establishing his own relationship with the written word, and it’s a beautiful thing for a mother to watch.  The icing on the cake is when he uses sentences like “One day, I’ll write a book about…”, or “This will make a great book one day…” or “One day, when I’m a writer…” and my heart skips a beat.

Depending on his mood, he could say that almost all the books listed above are his favorite. I know he means it, too.  He loves the experience of being read to, he loves the words on the page and I think most of all he loves getting lost in a story.  Stay tuned, as our summer reading wraps up I’ll introduce you to YC…he’s the funny one!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Sunday

I’ve always thought that Sunday’s were interesting creatures. For as long as I can remember, they’ve been my favorite day of the week.  Sometimes, they are warm, sunny, restful and peaceful.  Others are cold, rainy, cozy and playful.  Some Sundays are filled with family visits and church services, others are packed to the brim with overdue laundry, housework and the anticipation of the week ahead.  I made a conscious decision when I started this Magnolias & Manuscripts journey to post weekly on Sunday.  I may not feel inspired seven days a week, but somehow, I can count on waking up with the urge to write on a Sunday.  Maybe it’s because I’m most rested, after a playful weekend and two days of ‘sleeping in’.  Maybe it’s my own way of acknowledging my gifts and feeding my soul.  Maybe, it’s only because I can count on my husband being around and having a chance to sneak off with my laptop for a bit.  A typical Sunday at my house starts with a big breakfast.  Then we spend the morning playing outside and after lunch, everyone takes a nap.  (My famous words- “If God needed a day to rest then so do you”) We typically visit with some combination of someone’s grandparent(s), and depending on the season, end the day by grilling burgers or watching football.  Whatever they look like, I heart Sunday’s.

If I take it to a deeper level, I know that writing is how I best nurture myself and my creative urges.   It’s how I feed my soul in a way that honors what is sacred and special inside of me.  For me, writing is a spiritual experience and hope that you’ve found what it is that feeds your own soul in a similar way. There’s a creative side to everyone.  Sure, some can tap into it more easily and can channel it in more obvious ways.  But I hope you’re treating yourself to a bit of creative expression on this warm and rainy Sunday.

There have been 22 Sunday’s since I started blogging and 58 Sunday’s since I started writing picture books.  At some point, I extended a challenge to myself and increased my posts to twice weekly.  Over the course of this summer, Wednesday’s have been the day where we celebrate and document our summer reading goals.  As much fun as that has been, (3 weeks left!) I’ll return to weekly posts at the end of the summer.  I hope you’ll stick around, I have exciting things happening.

Sunday, July 30– Join me for an interview with Randi Lynn Mrvos, author of the soon to be released picture book Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell.  Check out her new website… http://www.randilynnmrvos.com/

Sunday, August 13– The introduction of my monthly interview series, Paper People.  Here, I track down and check in with debut picture book authors, one year after the launch of their book. There’s no greater teacher than the school of life, and these authors have much wisdom to share!

Sunday, August 20– Join me for my first Paper People interview with author/illustrator Jason Krischner!

Fitting in amongst all the great things mentioned above, will be a very special birthday post, my first ever picture book review (Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell) and hopefully good news when the contest winners are announced! (Kid Lit College’s Novelty Board Book Contest, and 2017 RYS Picture Book Contest)  Thanks for sharing another Sunday with me and as always…

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

– JP

Turning the spotlight

There’s one thing that I take almost as seriously as my writing, and that’s my critiquing.  For those of you not familiar with this aspect of the Kid Lit world, I’ll fill you in because it’s a curious but necessary process. You can pay people to critique your manuscript, join critique groups, and/or establish critique partnerships.  It’s a swapping of stories, suggestions, and constructive criticism, from people across the industry.  Think of it as “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours” but instead it’s “You read mine, provide feedback, I’ll gladly do the same.”  Many published authors provide critiquing services for a fee since they have the industry insight and personal success to stand on, but there are countless free opportunities as well.  I’ve talked about it before, I have a group, a few partnerships and some experience with paid services.

I enjoy critiquing, and as I said, I take it seriously.  If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a posse to publish a book.  I try hard not to use empty words, keeping my comments productive and never shy away from the hard/awkward/clumsy/obvious questions.   I approach every critique as a way to help another writer, and I’m hopeful that those who look at my work for me do the same.  It’s all about karma, folks. I want to be an active and engaged member of this community. I want to contribute in a way that helps me to find success but also helps others on their way to publication.  I want to be known as a good and effective critique partner.

Every chance I can, I learn something about writing, and the same is true for my critiques.  I make notes and follow a similar set of questions/prompts.  I always give it more than one look, and usually ‘put a sleep cycle on it.’ Do you know what I don’t do?  I don’t do a very good job when it comes to critiquing myself.  This glaring truth surfaced this week, as I was getting ‘final’ thoughts from a couple of different partners, and they each sent stories my way.  I thought about the WIP that I’m readying for a contest, and realized that if I looked at my own work, I would have comments for days! What’s the deal? Why is there a disconnect in my brain?  How is it that I can hold others to higher standards but my own story slips by with major structural/formatting issues? Thankfully this came to light in time to shine the light on my own work.  I took my critiquing process and turned the tables, forcing myself to look at my WIP as someone else would.  To make a long story short, it was a roller coaster and my self-esteem took a hit.  Thankfully, I’m resilient and I was able to work through it.  I think, and hope, that I elevated my story to a new, and necessary level.  As soon as I hit ‘publish’, I’m sending in my contest entry.  He’s as ready as he’ll ever be.  Wish me luck!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Week Six

I’m afraid my adorable guest reviewers have left me high and dry this week.  Well, that’s not technically true since it’s been raining every day, but regardless, I’m solo.  I can’t blame them though, spending a week at the farm, swimming, picking watermelons and chasing bunnies does sound like a lot of fun.  Thankfully I didn’t lose momentum without them, (let’s be honest, I’m doing this for me anyway!)  I think this is one of the best groups of books yet.  I substituted a couple from the list with some books I needed for other projects, and they were a wonderful fit.  Strategically, or coincidentally placed throughout Book Nerd Mommy’s list (see link at the bottom for the full list) are wordless picture books, this week was no exception.  Journey was a beautiful story about the power of creativity, color and imagination.  Maybe Something Beautiful had a similar theme and was based on true events.  Journey: Based off of OR7 The Most Famous Wolf in the West was also based on true events, and was written by a debut picture book author.  Let Me Finish was also written by a debut author, and I’m pretty sure was based off of the events of my everyday life… okay not really, but its adorable and I completely empathize with the struggle!

This probably doesn’t come as much of a surprise, but I’ve been trying to educate myself on the ins and outs of debut authors. Your only ‘debut’ once, and we all hope to be there one day, right?  This desire has been exacerbated (nursing word!) by participating on a book launch team, and seeing some of the behind the scenes goodness.  Little (or widely) known fact: Authors are responsible for the majority of their books marketing.  Some publishing houses even want a written marketing plan from their authors.  It seems prudent to me, to learn as much as I can, while writing as much as I can, and reading as much as I can.  That’s it folks, one day if I make it big, that’s the advice I’ll share… Read. Write. Learn. Always and Often.  I’ll be the guinea pig and let you know how it turns out! Here’s the list of books from this week and a link to Book Nerd Mommy’s full list of 100 Picture Books for Your Summer Reading.

  1. Let Me Finish! by Minh Le & Isabel Roxas
  2. Maybe Something Beautiful by F. Isabel Campony, Theresa Howell & Rafael Lopez
  3. Journey by Aaron Becker
  4. Journey: Based On the True Story of OR7 the Most Famous Wolf in the West by Emma Bland Smith & Robin James
  5. Put Me in a Zoo by Robert Lopshire
  6. They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenxzel
  7. If I Had A Gryphon by Vikki Vansickle & Cale Atkinson
  8. Billy and Goat at the State Fair by Dan Yaccarion
  9. The Adventures of Beekle by Dan Santat
  10. City Shapes by Diana Murray & Bryan Collier

You’ll be happy to know that I did complete my homework from Sunday, and even turned it in early…Writing in first person, it was more fun than I thought! Also, stay tuned later this month, I’m interviewing Randy Lynn Mrvos, editor of Kids Imagination Train and author of Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell just days before the books big release!

Here’s the link I promised you!

http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Finding his voice

Nathan.  The beloved main character of my precious, first manuscript.  I know him better than anyone, obviously, and sometimes refer to him as my fourth child.   It’s been over a year since I wrote his story and am constantly trying to do him justice.  I am a significantly better writer today than I was one year ago, at least when it comes to picture books,  so I know it’s improving.  There’s still something missing though; a disconnect that I haven’t been able to put my finger on.  He actually came close to getting shelved, since I last blogged about him, except I promised him a contest entry at the end of this month.  That makes me panic because he’s still not ready.

I have a critique partner who often says, “I love your voice!” when we swap emails about writing, mom-ing and all kinds of other unrelated randomness.  If this weren’t an electronic friendship, I’d think she was making fun of my thick Cajun accent. (Which thankfully not many of you have heard that yet! (I hope you find it ‘charming’ when you do.) I know what she’s saying, I’m animated and excited when I’m writing authentically.  I use A LOT of exclamation points, and I write what I speak when it comes to easy correspondence. I’ve known for a long time, that when I start trying too hard, my writing comes across as serious and stuffy.  It’s the difference between polite birthday party conversation and having a cup of coffee with a good friend.  It wasn’t until she said this, and did so more than once, that I had a bit of a writer’s revelation.  I think his voice is missing.

Sure, you could argue that his voice is actually my voice, but it’s missing none the less.  Here’s what I realized, going way back to the beginning.  I thought that writing in rhyme, which is how Nathan’s story started, was a good disguise.  A cute, rhyming rhythm was a way to glaze over the fact that I have a serious tone and limited knowledge.  Fast forward a few months, I learned a lot and shed the rhyme.  No doubt, it was one of the best things I’ve ever done, but it left holes in my story.  I’ve filled in many of the holes but never made it around to this one. Like all great critique partners, she issued a challenge.  Write the story from his perspective; tell it in his words.  So, that’s what my next move will be.  I’m going to take my third person story, and write it in first person, from the angle of a five-year-old boy.  I don’t imagine it’ll stay like this, but I do believe that it will reap great rewards.  I’m even cutting this short and sweet so I can get to my homework assignment.  The contest opens July 15, I’m writing on borrowed time!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Week 5 of Our #100PictureBookSummer

 

I can’t believe that we’re half way through our summer reading list!  I have to be honest, I lost track of the week with yesterday being a holiday and today feeling like ANOTHER Monday.  But I’m here, we’ve been reading and this week is all about OC.

Seven and a half years ago, we dove head first into our life as parents with the birth of this precious girl.  She made her grand entrance earlier than expected, and with a little more excitement than we planned.  Wouldn’t you know it, she still does things on her own time and always with a bit of flair.  Her curly hair was and still is, a perfect match for her personality.  She’s equal parts cautious and impulsive, inquisitive and certain, and one hundred percent generous and thoughtful.   Lucky for me, she has the memory of an elephant; that often comes in handy when you’re an absent-minded momma.  She’s the first one to read any of my manuscripts, and she’s the silent third party of all my critique partnerships.  OC reads well, reads often and loves it most when she’s reading to her younger brothers. This week, with the list below, I asked her to read a little deeper into each story.  I wanted to know, not only her favorites but also the theme in each one.  We talked about the main characters, and the change each one underwent as the story unfolded.  She couldn’t pick out of the following two, and who was I do decide?  (spoiler alerts below)

  1. Ellie by Mike Wu
  2. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by A. Wolf as told to Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith
  3. Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
  4. Swatch by Julia Denos
  5. Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue and Pamela Aagarenski
  6. Red Cat, Blue Cat by Jenni Desmond
  7. Balderdash! By Michelle Markel and Nancy Carpenter
  8. Are We There, Yeti? by Ashlyn Ashtee
  9. Tuesday by David Wiesner
  10. Cloudette by Tom Lichtenheld (this one was a personal homework assignment from a friend, and a perfect fit… thanks, JH!)

For the full list of books we’re reading check out Book Nerd Mommy’s blog here http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

“First, I really liked Red Cat, Blue Cat.  At the beginning of the book, they don’t like each other, until they try to be just like the other one.  Once they tried to be each other and it didn’t work out, they realized that being their own selves was the best of all.  That’s how it should be, really, you should always be happiest with who you really are.  I also liked Ellie, she was so sad because she didn’t have a talent.  All she wanted to do was help, but in the end, she discovered she had the greatest talent of all and saved the day.  We all have special things about us, we just need to use them.”

Wise words, from my wise girl.  I appreciate these books and the conversations they inspire more with each passing week.  But then again, picture books have always been, and will always be pure magic.  Thanks for hanging in through 50.  Wish us luck for our last few weeks!

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

July

July has arrived, with all her sweltering heat and mighty mosquitoes.   As a family, this is often the month where we take a collective sigh and settle in for the second half of summer.  School starts in early August in these parts, so this is our calm before the school year storm.  As a writer, my month will be full and fun… here’s a little of what I have going on.

  • WOW Nonficpic (July 10-14) is an online seminar on writing non-fiction picture books hosted by Children’s Author, Kristen Fulton. I’m a history buff, and a science nerd so the thought of expanding my writing skill set to include non-fiction books is very exciting.  For more info, http://www.kristenfulton.org/
  • I’m working on an author interview series that will begin here, on Magnolias and Manuscripts next month. I’m not ready to discuss all the nitty gritty details yet, but it will involve debut picture book authors and it’s going to be great! Stay tuned!
  • #PBHOT62 (http://www.renatraxel.com/literacy–art/summer-reading-challenge-for-picture-book-writers) is an exciting opportunity that I signed up for, but I think I bit off more than I can chew. Rena Traxel, librarian and children’s writer put together a fun and interactive challenge to encourage picture book writers to read more picture books.  Each day, for the next 62, participants will post pictures of themselves from her list of suggestions, reading a different picture book.  I thought it would fit in nicely with our #100PictureBookSummer, but I just don’t know that I can manage 62 posts, because…. drumroll….
  • The most exciting thing going on for me this month… I’ve been asked to be a part of a book launch team! I mentioned Randi Mrvos in an earlier post, she’s been a kind and generous mentor for me and I’m very excited to return the favor and help to introduce the world to her ‘Maggie’.  If you follow me on Instagram, Twitter or are a Facebook friend of mine, you’ll see daily posts starting tomorrow to help spread the word about her book debut which happens this August.  (I even get an ARC to review!  You’ll definitely hear more about that here.) To learn more about Maggie check out her journey at http://themaggieproject.blogspot.com/

Blame it on the heat… or the holiday, but that’s all I have for today.  I hope everyone has a wonderful and safe Independence Day.  Here’s to the land of the free, home of the brave.

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP