Be My Guest, Julie LaCombe!

Hi there my friends! Today I have the chance to introduce you to a dear friend of mine by way of a new series, Be My Guest! Over the past year, I’ve been lucky enough to strike up friendships with a few terrific pre-published picture book authors and I want you to know (and remember) their names. Today, my dear friend Julie joins me for a soothing cup of rose tea that she brought all the way from the Lone Star state. (My attempt to enjoy tea is the REAL work in progress here.) Julie and I ended up in the same critique group and bonded over similarities in our first stories (coincidentally or not, they’ve both been shelved.) There have been countless small world connections since we first started swapping manuscripts, she married a boy from my corner of the world and I know one that grew up down the street from her. I was lucky enough to have a front row seat as Julie found her non-fiction voice and I’m so glad she did! She has a wonderful gift of spinning facts into a story and was gracious enough to Be My (first) Guest! Read along as she tells you about her journey to writing non-fiction for kids, and then stroll on over to her site (https://julielacombeauthor.wordpress.com) and see all the good stuff she has going on!

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     I’m a left-brained person. I like lists. I like learning. I like things wrapped up in neat little packages. I LOVE research! My love of research was the result of my brilliant, NASA engineer dad who paid me to research topics when I was a kid. Beginning in the third grade, he taught me how to write research papers and paid me one dollar per report. I quickly came to realize that, it wasn’t the money I wanted but the facts I was collecting! From there I started adding to my school lessons (much to my teachers’ chagrin), amazing (or boring) my friends and irritating my brother with facts.

I thrive on finding bizarre and obscure people, facts and events. I hoard newspaper clippings, and keep a traveler’s notebook filled with things I hear in conversations (yes, I eavesdrop!), on TV programs and movies, or see around me. It’s bursting with questions about everyday objects, why people invent things, how they come up with ideas, etc. Questions are constantly swirling through my brain. My children laugh at me when I begin what they call my “informational lectures” after I’ve found an odd historical fact or learned about an amazing unknown person in history. I get excited and passionate because I want to learn more.

So, how did I come to realize that nonfiction was my niche? I felt like a fraud, unimaginative and bored anytime I tried to write creative fiction. I had tons of ideas, but when I sat down to write, I couldn’t. It came out flat and boring. Then, one day my family paid a visit to a local history museum and BAM! It hit me in the face like a bug hits a windshield…There are stories to tell about all of those weird facts I like to collect. I focused my passion for learning into teaching. I used my love for research to find those unknown nuggets to interest and excite my students. As a history teacher, I did everything I could to bring history alive through primary sources and teaching the facts through storytelling. I never thought about writing … UNTIL three years ago. I was watching a fictionalized series about one of my favorite historical events with my husband and something they said ignited a spark. It was a reminder of my passion for sharing fun history with kids.

     The first lesson most writers learn is “write what you know,” but I think that is false advertisement for ANY writer, especially nonfiction writers. Think about it. Did Jules Verne travel twenty thousand leagues under the sea? Did H.G. Wells time travel? I think better advice is to write what you are passionate about. For me, writing nonfiction is like going on a treasure hunt. You start with an idea which is your treasure map, except there is no X that marks the spot. The treasure is that little tidbit of the unknown and you have to jump from one path to the next until you find your way there. The struggle I constantly have is figuring out what to include and not to include. I want to include EVERYTHING I find! Prolific author John McPhee calls writing nonfiction “literature of fact.” Newbery winner Russell Freedman calls himself a “factual author.” I like that. I’m a factual author!

     So how does writing fiction differ from nonfiction, aside from the obvious? In writing fiction, you work to lure a story line into existence. With nonfiction, we have to recognize the story line that’s already there. The structure of factual information is already in existence. A nonfiction writer has to then flesh out the story and make it interesting and add heart. That’s the hard part. Finding the voice of the story and giving it a life that will appeal to readers yet still remain factual.  And that’s what I love about writing nonfiction. I get to research and learn about something I’m passionate about and then to mold it into a story that others will love.

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I love learning new things about my friends! A NASA engineer for a father? Cool! I hope you enjoyed getting to know Julie, I can’t wait for the day when you say to yourself “I’ve actually known about her since way back before she was a successful author!”
That’s all for now! But there is always more to come, more musings, more interviews and more friends for you to meet.
Thanks for reading, come back anytime!
-JP

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9 thoughts on “Be My Guest, Julie LaCombe!

  1. Very interesting story. I learned a new perspective differentiating fiction vs. non-fiction from an aspiring author’s viewpoint.

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  2. Julie, it is great to know more about you and your journey into nonfiction kidlit. I love that you have notebooks of questions. I hope to see them all published one day. Thanks for sharing tidbits into your research. I’ve always wondered how nf writers decide what info makes it into the story and which parts to cut. I’m sure editing is not an easy process but worth it when the story all comes together. Jenny, thanks for introducing us!

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