Making Magic, Picture Book Style

Let’s say you have a bit of extra cash to spend on yourself and your writing aspirations: Where do you go? Which way do you turn?  Who can help? Arghhhh, the struggle! There are so many choices! It’s a great problem to have, really, because so many of the leaders in the kid-litosphere generously give of their time, talents and expertise.  Truly, there is no shortage of options or opportunities. For me, and I’m sure so many others, the trouble lies in deciding which course to invest in.  There’s a unique twist to each one and the author/instructors are incredibly talented, so you really can’t go wrong. The fact of the matter is, you do have to choose, though. So, if you’re sitting at the crossroads of one versus the other, all I can do is wish you luck and tell you about my latest experience with making magic… Making Picture Book Magic, that is.

If you aren’t familiar, Making Picture Book Magic is a month-long course offered by Susanna Hill, with small class sizes, daily assignments and feedback from Susanna, herself.  I’m always wary of buyer’s remorse and know the feeling of investing in a class/webinar that turns out to be disappointing so I eyed it for months and was exhaustive in my research.  I asked everyone I knew about their experience. Many had taken it ‘back when they were starting out’ and a few warned me that I probably knew everything she would review.  Some said I might find it too basic, others never made it thought all the lessons.  One of my nearest and dearest friends, however declared it “one of the best things” she’d ever done for herself.  She had yet to steer me wrong before, (I’m looking at you Judy Cooper) so, I bit the bullet and enrolled.  The tuition for the course was a belated birthday gift from two of my biggest fans (aka mom & dad).  As luck would have it, I was blessed with an incredible group to journey though the month of January with and it only got better from there.

Yes, some of the lessons brought me back to the basics, but I knew that’s exactly what I needed. (The day that I decide that I’ve learned enough about writing picture books should be my last day writing… am I right?) Going back to the basics, now that I have a foundation helped IMMENSLY.  You might call it cheating, but I used an existing manuscript through the course and basically stripped it down to the studs.  It was the most exhaustive revision I’ve ever done. I rethought and reworked every aspect of the story, I pushed myself out of my comfort zone for this project and got helpful feedback along the way, both from my groupmates and our fearless leader! (I want to pause and talk for a minute about the other writers in my group… they ROCKED! We all engaged with each other via the private Facebook group and I know that’s what pushed our course over the edge from good to GREAT! If you ever do decide to participate, do yourself a favor and go all in… participate, share, offer feedback, engage. You’ll get out everything you put in and then some!)

I’ve suggested this course every chance I get because I know it was a game-changer for me.  It changed the way I revise, it changed the way I approach my stories, and hopefully, it’ll change the trajectory of my pre-published journey. If you’re looking for a way to sharpen your skills, someone to hold you accountable or a handful of new revision techniques, look no farther and let Susanna Hill show you all about Making Picture Book Magic! (<- that’s the link right there, don’t miss it… click on it)

Oh! Before you go, I want to introduce you to my classmates! There were a couple poets (Rebecca & Liz) and an illustrator (Hannah) in the mix.  Liz has a collection of soccer poems called Soccerverse, set to release on June 4th! The other three writers will undoubtedly be names on your bookshelf one day, each with their own style but obviously and equally talented. Find them & follow them so you’ll be one the first to know when their clever and charming stories make it into the world.

          Rebecca Gardyn Levington on Twitter: @WriterRebeccaGL 

          Stephanie Williams aka @StephanieBoyer (also Twitter)

          Liz Steinglass, Twitter: @ESteinglass IG: @elizabethsteinglass & Facebook @ElizabethSteinglass

          Hannah Spiegleman, IG @HannahSpiegleman

 

As always,

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

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Questions & Answers

I didn’t understand… I had been eagerly anticipating this two-hour window all week. For the first time in longer than I’d care to admit, I was headed to the library and straight into the children’s section. I couldn’t wait to wander around, pulling new finds and old favorites off the shelf to soak up and read quietly. But I found myself speeding though the books, unsatisfied.  In fact, some of my favorites, I didn’t even finish! There was a restlessness and unsettled spirit I couldn’t put my finger on.  Fewer buildings brought me as much joy as a library, and never more so then surrounded by picture books. This was completely unprecedented in my happy place!

To be fair, I made this trip on a week that was rough.  I’ve written about conference hangovers before, and this year I’ve been struggling to shake it.  I mean really struggling. I haven’t been reading like I should, so I intentionally scheduled this library run for myself. It was supposed to brighten my mood and lift my spirits, instead I “wasted time” (I even started scrolling Facebook instead of turning pages, GASP.) I managed to eek out a few minutes of revisions on a manuscript that I was carrying, to save face (from myself) and limped out the door. I didn’t check out any books, I didn’t want to bring anything home tainted with the mood of the day. I felt lost.

The next few hours were a blur of homework, dance costumes and baseball practice. I had nearly forgotten about my dreadful afternoon. Then I turned off the lights, laid down in bed and started to cry.  The tears came with such intensity, I was completely stunned. I didn’t understand where they came from, or why they were happening… until I did. When I started this journey, my oldest was prime picture book age and most probably went over my youngest’s head. But here we are, 2 out of 3 of my kids read MG novels to themselves before bed at night. I’ve effectively instilled a love of reading in them, and now, they don’t need me. My youngest will be in Kindergarten next year and still loves to crawl on my lap and listen to a story, but I see how my time is running out. Soon, the picture books that I bring home from the library will be just for me.  It made me sad and if I’m honest, enormously disappointed.

I recognize how I felt at the library now, in my line of work, we call it anticipatory grief; the mourning of an expected loss, before it actually happens. I secretly hoped to be closer to being published by now.  I knew to anticipate the journey to be long, but that didn’t stop me from hoping for something different.  It was an unofficial, off the record, self-inflicted (grossly unrealistic) deadline that was about to pass me by. The tears also finally brought to the surface all the questions and self-doubt that I had been trying to silence. We all know that avoiding a question doesn’t make it go away, and so the longer I tried, the louder they got and the farther away I pushed my stories and social media; facing my characters and the kidlit world I love meant facing the questions.   Questions of my dedication to the dream, my abilities to write and the intention behind it all anyway.  No one ever told me that this journey would be easy. Nothing I’ve ever read said that publishing is for the faint of heart, quite the opposite actually.  A few years ago, I could easily answer the why’s and how’s… but lately, it’s been murky to say the least.  

Thankfully, tears are often the prequel to clarity.  I decided to continue showing up, writing a little each day, even if it didn’t feel earth-shattering, and re-engaging with my community. I even wrote myself a post-it note that says, SHOW UP TO WORK.  If I had to guess, that’s one of the greatest struggles as a pre-published, un-agented author.  No one is waiting on us to show up. No one, except for the main characters of our stories and the deep-seated desires of our own heart begging to be set free.  Since that day there have been enjoyable library trips, conversations with my kids about my WIPs with new stories (& blog posts) surging to the surface. I think I feel relief too, free from the burden of an approaching deadline that I was never supposed to meet. I’m excited to see what’s next. I’m eager to write each day, and I’ll keep showing up as long as you do too.

Valentiny 2019!

Hello and a Happy Valentines Day to you!

For so many people, Valentine’s Day means flowers, chocolate, and showering those you love with… well, love! I do love flowers, and chocolate and I promise to shower 😉 but for me, Valentine’s day means one (other) thing, Susanna Hill’s

4th ANNUAL PRETTY MUCH WORLD FAMOUS VALENTINY WRITING CONTEST!

Without further ado, here’s my entry. Good luck to all the participants! We’re all winners already because we showed up, wrote something and shared it with the world… long distance high five!

—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —

Scooter’s Swap.

Scooter couldn’t sleep.

He had never broken a window before. He hadn’t ever hit a baseball that far before, either.

And he didn’t mean for Freddie to get in trouble, but, when his mom started yelling at Freddie, Scooter didn’t stop her.

The next morning, Scooter thought he might be sick. He dreaded the thought of Freddie being mad at him. But it was Valentine’s Day, which meant the neighborhood Sweet Swap.  If he told his mom the truth, she’d never let him go. If he didn’t go, he would miss out on Ms. Susie’s Strawberry Schmoozies. Those were his favorite cookies, ever.  

At recess, Freddie wouldn’t even look at him.

In the lunchroom, Scooter sat alone. “Is a cookie even worth it?” he asked himself.

During class, Scooter wanted to cry. Valentine’s Day was one of his favorites, but today had been the worst.

After school, he climbed into his mom’s car and crumbled, his truth and tears came pouring out.  

Once they were home, Scooter walked next door. As soon as he saw Freddie, it all came rushing out again. “I’m sorry,” Scooter said, while Freddie just stared. After a minute, Freddie ran inside leaving Scooter to worry and wait.  

Soon, Freddie was back with a Strawberry Schmoozie and a smile.

— — — — — — — — — — — — — —

That’s all folks!  Please visit the other amazing list of entries on Susanna Hill’s blog!

 

Thanks for stopping by, come back anytime!

-JP

 

The Alchemist.

When it comes to books that have been read and re-read, it’s the only one that can give PRIDE & PREJUDICE a run for her money. In fact, as I’m starting it again, I realize it might soon pull out into the lead.  These two books whet different parts of my literary appetite; one sweeps me off my feet and transports me to a different time and place, the other takes me on a deep dive in the here & now. What Jane Austen does for my fairy tale fantasies, Paul Coelho does for my soul.

“To realize one’s Personal Legend is a person’s only real obligation.”

So, I’ve started it again, and ‘ve never been more excited. Have you read it? Do you remember the stones given to Santiago, from the King, at the start of his journey? This book is my own Urim and Thurmmim. I’ve loved, lived and underlined different parts of the book and like any true classic, every time I pick it up, I learn something new. But, if you asked me to narrow it down and tell  you exactly why I love this story, cover to cover, I would say that the journey Santiago takes, continues to teach me so much about myself. Of course, at different times, certain aspects of his journey speak louder than others. When I was working at the bedside, caring for patients and their families all day then coming home to care for my own at night, I could see myself, working tirelessly in the crystal shop right alongside him. There are times when I’ve been in a personal dessert, an oasis and wandering aimlessly through fields herding a pack of animals (or children, you pick.) But it’s the simple wisdom and truths that speak the loudest, especially as I continue this journey and write for children.

“And when you want something, all the universe conspires to help you achieve it.”

I’m no different than everyone else on the planet (or so it seems), I took stock of myself at the end of 2018 and my writing journey. To sum it up, 2018 had its ups and downs, including form rejections and the sweetest of champagne ones. I asked questions, wrote stories, participated in contests and took leaps of faith. Luckily, there were more triumphs than slumps and more stories written in 2018 than years prior, so I’m calling it a win.  I completely believe that every pass, every rejection and every ridiculous moment of inspiration are all steps along my path to publication. In his story, Santiago pays attention to the omens, signs pointing him in the direction of his journey.  In my story, I’ll do the same, and over the past year, those omens have come in the form of dear friendships, encouraging words and honorable mentions.  And the rejections? There’s another quote I keep handy for those…

“Don’t forget that everything you deal with is only one thing, and nothing else.”

I can’t wait to see what 2019 has in store, especially as I find myself reading Santiago’s story again. I think I know where I am in my journey, but I also know better than to assume. I do know I’m starting off strong, and I hope you are too. I also hope that you’ve found your rhythm again (or maybe a brand-new routine) and you’re able to ride the energy and inspiration that January brings far into 2019.

Here is my plan for 2019: (not because you asked, just so I can hold myself accountable.)

          12 interviews

          12 book reviews

          12 blog posts

  Of course I’m going to continue to write new manuscripts, send out queries, participate in contests and challenges across the Kid Lit landscape (I can’t wait to share more about my experience with Storystorm and Making Picture Book Magic, both are happening as we speak.) I also still have my other writing gig at Lafayette’s Moms Blog (new post coming Thursday!) It feels great to be here, rambling about writing. I hope that whatever it is you’re doing, as this new year picks up steam, it brings you joy.

“The Soul of the World is nourished by people’s happiness.”

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

I want to write a picture book.

It’s like a craving I can’t satisfy or an itch I can’t scratch. I want to write a new picture book manuscript and I mean I really want to write one. I’ve been keeping my eyes open for untold stories, tending my creative soil, and even invited inspiration over to stay a while. (Or at least as long as it takes to put 500 words to paper.) I have a nice guest room that doubles as my home office, the walls are covered with character studies and there’s a rose bush growing outside the window. I would be a lovely place for inspiration to stay! Bad news is, I’ve got nothing, or as my husband would say “crickets.” I want to write a picture book, but I’m writing a blog post instead.

Of course, I’ve written a few before. I lost count somewhere around 20, and that was before 2018 even started. Some are good, some are not, some rhyme, some don’t, a few I don’t even remember writing and others keep me up at night. Surely, it’s a unique struggle, writing picture books means quantity AND quality are equally important. If I were writing a novel, I might’ve spent the past three years living within the same story, fleshing it out and building it up. (Which is an incredible feat that keeps me amazed and in awe.) But as a picture book writer, I need new inspiration, often. New stories, fresh ideas, different main characters and unique plot twists.  Apparently, I need at least three polished manuscripts to successfully ‘woo’ an agent.  Not to mention, I once read about a successful picture book author who calculates that she’s written about 20 manuscripts for every story that’s actually been sold and made into a picture book. With odds like that, I might have 2 winners on my hands. I believe in Elizabeth Gilbert’s theory of inspiration. I believe in BIG MAGIC and I work hard on my relationship with creativity.  But let’s get real, it’s a numbers game, people, and I just want to write one little picture book to add to my collection. IS THAT TOO MUCH TO ASK?!?

I want to write a picture book, but I’m writing a blog post instead because I’m hoping to trick inspiration into paying me a visit.  I’m hoping that I get extra credit for sitting at my laptop and putting words to paper, even if they’re directed at adults and I’m really just writing for myself. It’s November 25th, so far this year I’ve honored my 12×12 commitment and written a new draft each month. I have five days left of the month, and one month left in the year… I need to write a picture book.  

The good thing about being a nurse is that we are excellent self-diagnosticians; that’s where my brain headed tonight. What’s my official diagnosis, you ask? Picture book (writers) block and the really difficult pill to swallow is I don’t think I caught it randomly; I think it’s been self-inflicted.  So, there’s the new writing gig, and I’ve been working hard on those posts which have a much different target audience and theme than these Magnolia posts or my picture book manuscripts. Along the same lines, I’ve been reading a lot of ‘mom’s blog’ posts, to support my fellow writers and brush up on my skills. It’s an important thing for me to be doing, but it’s taking me away from reading picture books. Also, my husband has been reading to the kids, before bed, most nights. It’s been super sweet and helpful and it’s everyone’s favorite part to the day, but it’s taken me away from reading picture books… I need to read more picture books.  

I want to write a picture book, but I’m writing a blog post instead because of THIS. I need to get down to the bottom of the problem I’m having. I know what you’re going to say, ‘try priming the creative pump, silly’. That involves my sewing machine, or some vinyl and a paintbrush. I’ve used both (relatively) recently, so the creative juices are flowing around these parts. However, there have also been quite a few extracurricular activities using my energy and keeping me away from my writing routine.  In fact, as I think back over these past few weeks, it’s no wonder inspiration hasn’t visited me! I basically invited my long-lost friend over to watch me frantically cook, clean and decorate my home for a party she wasn’t invited to… I need to make time for picture books.

I want to write a picture book, but I wrote a blog post instead.  From the very beginning of my time as a blogger, nearly 2 years ago, I said I wanted to capture the journey. This definitely isn’t the most glamorous part, nor the most exciting, but like an airport layover, it’s important and so here I am, convinced that I’m making progress even while I wait.

To sum up our visit, I’m asking for inspiration but not making time for it on my calendar. I’m hoping for a lightning-bolt idea without surrounding myself with similar stories. I’m talking the talk, but not sure I’m walking the walk. Nothing like taking a good hard look in a mirror, eh? I know this hasn’t been too exciting for you, but it sure has been eye-opening for me. At this rate, I hope I haven’t ticked off picture-book-inspiration off to the point of no return. I guess there’s only one way to find out… I know what a good starting point will be! Come back soon, I’ll review the precious book my friend Didi wrote (it finally came in!)

I hope your Thanksgiving week was full of joy, gratitude and endless amounts of your favorite pie.

I also hope you know that I’m grateful for you.

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Willa wants a bite!

When Willa walked inside,

Her nose picked up a scent.

Today is Halloween!

She knew what that smell meant.

 

The cauldron, piping hot.

It was her favorite meal!

Just thinking of the stew

Made Willa want squeal.

 

She pleaded for a taste.

Her stomach gave a growl.

Mom said she’d have to wait.

She howled a hungry howl.

 

Then pulled on her costume

And shivered down the road.

She hoped when she returned

She’d have a candy load!

 

And after the last house

Shared all their tricks and treats

She raced home, just in time,

A frightfully good feast!

 

 

In my family, Halloween has become the de facto favorite holiday.  We all gather at my parent’s house and cousins in costumes trick or treat around the neighborhood while Nana & Papa pass out candy. After every house on the block has been hit up for candy, we all rush back and feast on her famous Taco Soup. Its (barely) controlled chaos and we all love it.  My contribution this year will be three Looney Toons characters; Daffy, Bugs and the Roadrunner to be exact. 

I hope that whatever your plans are tomorrow, the weather is wonderful, moods are cheerful and there is plenty of the good candy to go around.  The story above is my entry into Susanna Leonard Hill’s Halloweensie contest.  The rules are simple, 100 words or less, must take place on Halloween and incorporate three words decided on by Her Majesty, Queen of Contests (Susanna, of course) at the start; this year’s words are cauldron, howl, and shiver. (I checked all the boxes and had one word to spare!  Plus, I’ve never entered a rhyme before!) If you have any extra time, head over to her website and check out all of the fantastic entries!

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

 

Crossroads.

A few months ago, I came to a seemingly clumsy crossroads. I love blogging, and picture books are still one of my favorite subjects… but I’ve covered a lot of ground in the past couple of years and I don’t really have anything new to report.  (Still writing, revising, submitting and waiting.) I feel like I’ve run out of topics that would be helpful and informative and I loathe the idea of writing without substance. So, I stalled.  I’m incredibly grateful for Paper People, those interviews have kept me connected but once a month isn’t enough. I love writing to adult audiences as much as I love working through picture book revisions and I’ve really been missing it.  I thought long and hard about revising my content here, to make room for other musings, but it never really felt ‘right.’ I want to broaden my topics and write from my personal & parenting experience but couldn’t figure out a way that blends the two naturally.

Well, fast forward to the end of August, after a particularly powerful lunch with a friend, I had a message waiting in my inbox.  If you believe in coincidences, I can see where this might fit into that category, I prefer to think of it as incredibly serendipitous.  Long story, short, at the nudging of a (different) friend, I applied and was accepted as a contributor for Lafayette Mom’s Blog! I’ve been a follower and a fan of theirs for months, and I’m thrilled to have another writing outlet and find myself surrounded by like-minded mommas.  (Not to mention I have something to add to my cover letter’s now!)   

One of the things I’m most excited about it to have a platform to share my love of literacy, supporting local authors and shining the light on the up and comers of the kid lit industry.  I do imagine there will be a lot of crossover content, and I can’t wait! I hope you’ll click over and check out their website, even if you aren’t local (or a mom!)  I’m already overwhelmed with ideas and hope I can bring some of them to fruition.  I also feel energy and inspiration pulsing again, in the way that creativity begets creativity, writing helps me to write more! Now I have deadlines and decisions in front of me, and a whole world of topics waiting to be covered. I hope you’ll stick around; Magnolias & Manuscripts will always be my first love.

Would you believe it? Just sitting down to write this post lit a small but very necessary fire under me! Stay tuned for the October edition of Paper People, it’s going to be epic!

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

 

The Waiting Place.

“Waiting for the fish to bite

Or waiting for wind to fly a kite

Or waiting around for Friday night

Or waiting, perhaps, for their Uncle Jake

Or a pot to boil or a Better Break

Or a string of pearls, or a pair of pants

Or a wig with curls, or Another Chance.

Everyone is just waiting.”

 

It’s been said before, but I’ll say it again… the pursuit of publishing is not for the faint of heart! The rejections will knock the wind out of your sails, sure, but by far the most challenging ‘nearly-make-you-lose-your-mind’ part is all… the… waiting. To be fair I don’t even know about the kind of waiting that comes when a book is ACTUALLY being published, which is a whole other breed of monster I’m sure (which I imagine feels a lot like a 24month pregnancy.)  I’m only talking about the waiting that comes after you finally hit ‘send.’

I’ve been doing my research, right? I believe I have ‘enough’ picture book manuscripts that are ‘ready’. (Though who ever really knows how much is ‘enough’ and when something is really ‘ready’?) I also have been paying close attention and have had an opportunity to submit a couple of those manuscripts to editors that are looking for something similar to what I have to offer.  So, I feel better about my chances than I have in a while. (I’m also having a déjà vu.) Taking it one step further, I had an exciting local opportunity that presented itself but was not without its own waiting game. Here I am, twiddling my thumbs, checking my inbox 157 times a day, each time simultaneously bracing for a rejection and hoping for a ‘revise and resubmit’ or maybe even a “Hey, I like this. Let’s talk!”  It’s enough to drive a girl crazy, I tell ya! Thankfully, I remembered the wise words of Dr. Seuss,

“NO!

That’s not for you!

Somehow you’ll escape

all that waiting and staying.

You’ll find the bring places

where Boom Bands are playing.”

The short version of a long story? I didn’t find ‘boom bands’ but I did find a paintbrush. Here’s what I’m working on…

piggy bank, etc

Both the piggy bank and the heart are symbols of some of my favorite works- in-progress. With the help of a few good songs, leftover craft paint and a quiet weekend afternoon, I channeled all of my ‘waiting’ anxieties into these projects. It didn’t completely erase the bouts of impatience, but I’m checking my email a lot less, and I reset my focus. For one I got my BIC and wrote this long overdue, post. (Am I right, Ali?)  I often forget, and eventually remember that creativity, away from my laptop is the best salve for an anxious itch. If you find yourself in a similar restless place, for whatever reason, try channeling those energies in a totally different direction! You might not find an answer, but I can almost promise you’ll have fun.

Want some good news? I have another great Paper People Interview coming your way. Next week, Randi Mrvos will join me again. The last time we talked her debut picture book was releasing and she’ll be joining me to talk about all that she’s learned in the past year.  If you want a refresher, check out my first interview and review of her delightful book MAGGIE AND THE SUMMER VACATION SHOW AND TELL.

 

Ps- I’m 1 for 3 on good news replies.  Eeek!

(Oh, and in case you didn’t know Dr. Seuss quotes are found in OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!)

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Weeks 8 & 9 but not quite 10.

We came up short, but finished strong.  Truth be told, my kids have no idea… it’s splitting hairs between 91 and 100 picture books, anyway. What we didn’t accomplish in completion, we more than made up for in engaging activities.  We read Ferdinand, then joined so many other kids and parents at the library one afternoon to watch the movie version (and work on revisions from the back row.) We read all of the latest releases by my local SCBWI group mates, Margaret Simon, Paul Schexnayder, Denise Gallagher and Allyson Foti-Bourque. We covered non-fiction in so many wonderful ways which started even more wonderful conversations that carried on throughout the summer. (Thanks to SHARK LADY and then Shark Week, I might just have an aspiring marine biologist on my hands.) There were beyond the book activities, author interviews, new favorites and classics revisited. We even ended the summer at our local Science Museum and retold tidbits, both facts and fiction from the books that visited our house. Some of the greatest parts of our summer were watching YC retell the stories in his own words, or MC finishing an entire ELEPHANT & PIGGIE book all on his own.  Then there was OC who started and finished an entire SERIES this summer (DIARY OF A WIMPY KID didn’t stand a chance) and branch out to embrace different genres.  All in all, I call this second year of summer reading a smashing success.  Here are the rest of the titles we read:

1.       The Story of Ferdinand by Murno Leaf

2.       Meet Dizzy Dinosaur by Jack Tickle

3.       No Sleep for the Sheep by Karen Beaumont, art by Jackie Urbanovic

4.       Hiccupotamus by Steve Smallman, art by Ada Grey

5.       The Seven Silly Eaters by Mary Ann Hoberman, art by Maria Frazee

6.       Are You My Mother? By P.D. Eastman

7.       Pete the Cat and the Lost Tooth by James Dean

8.       Boy + Bot by Ame Dyckman, art by Dan Yaccarino

9.       The Water Princess by Susan Verde, art by Peter Reynolds

10.   In the Time of Joy & Wonder by Paul Schexnayder

11.   Chloe and the Lion by Mac Barnett, art by Adam Rex

12.   Robot Rumpus by Sean Taylor, art by Ross Collins

13.   A Perfect Day by Lane Smith

14.   A Child’s Guide to Common Household Monsters by James Otis Thach, art by David Udovic

15.   Don’t Touch this Book by Bill Cotter

16.   Duck, Duck, Moose by Sudpita Bardhan-Quallen, art by Noah Z Jones

17.   Knuffle Bunny Free by Mo Willems

18.   Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

19.   Pete the Cat and his 4 Groovy Buttons by Eric Litwin, art by James Dean

20.   Lost for Words by Natalie Russell

21.   Shoo, Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold

 There was a symbolic, throwing in of the towel, however, and I think it’s an important conversation for another day.  The short version of a long story is that I lost track of the adult reader in me in the midst of all the picture books. My self-imposed summer reading challenge became something to merely ‘get through’ and I found myself reading out of obligation instead of pleasure. Sure, there’s something to be said about ‘when the going gets tough’ but I think, in this case, keeping the focus on my original intention was more important than finishing just for the sake of finishing.  Once I felt myself disengage, I knew it was only a matter of time before my kids caught on and followed suit.  I couldn’t let that happen and thankfully, the answer to my problem was right under my nose. 

Weeks ago, I borrowed a novel from the shelf of my sister. I carried it with me through vacations, afternoons by pool and waiting rooms at the doctor’s office but never once cracked the cover.  So, guess what I did? I read a book! Not just any book either, THE BOOK OF OVE. It was delightful and poignant, silly and sad and just what the doctor ordered. The fact that I took advantage of the slow pace of summer to indulge in moments of reading for myself is my shining achievement.  It may not seem like much, but it put balls in motion that I didn’t anticipate and gave me the chance to be more than mom, wife, writer and nurse… I was a reader again!

My kids are back in school now, summer is officially over for us (too bad the heat will stick around until the pumpkins come out) and this is the end of our second annual #100PictureBookSummer.  Thanks for all the recommendations and encouragement along the way!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

 

Weeks 5, 6 & 7!

This one could also be called ‘Important Books’ or ‘What happens when you bite off more blogging than you can chew!’… three weeks in one post, here goes!

1. How to Track a Truck by Jason Carter Eaton, illustrated by John Rocco (YC picked this one!)
2. I Won’t Eat That by Christopher Silas Neal
3. Boats for Papa by Jessixa Bagley (Wow. This one left me speechless.)
4. Elephant & Piggie, There is a Bird on Your Head! By Mo Willems (MC cannot get enough of these two.)
5. 101 Reasons Why I’m NOT Taking a Bath by Stacy McAnulty, illustrated by Joy Ang (#boymom)
6. The Scrambled States of America by Laurie Keller
7. May I Have a Word? By Caron Lewis, illustrated by Andy Rash
8. Moo! By David LaRouchelle, illustrated by Mike Wohnoutkla
9. Wolfie the Bunnie by Ame Dyckman, illustrated by Zacharia OHora
10. Elephant & Piggie Listen to My Trumpet! By Mo Willems (Seriously!)
11. Elephant & Piggie, Biggie! By Mo Willems (He’s inhaling these books like oxygen.)
12. After the Fall by Dan Santat (So incredibly necessary.)
13. It’s Raining by Gail Gibbons
14. Otis by Loren Long
15. The Umbrella by Jan Brett (Great recommendation! Thanks, Dawn)
16. Drawn Together by Minh Le, illustrated by Dan Santat
17. It’s Snowing by Gail Gibbons
18. The Story of Snow, The Science of Winter’s Wonder by Mark Cassino with Jon Nelson, Ph.D.
19. I Hatched! By Jill Esbaum, illustrated by Jen Corace (This may be one of my new favorites!)
20. Wherever You Go by Pat Zietlow Miller, illustrated by Eliza Wheeler
21. Knuffle Bunny Too, a case of mistaken identity by Mo Willems
22. Grandmother Thorn by Katey Howes, illustrated by Rebecca Hahn (Paper People, coming soon!)
23. Little Blue Truck by Alice Schertle, illustrated by Jill McElmurry
24. Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker, illustrated by Tom Lichteneld
25. What Could Be Better Than This? By Linda Ashman, illustrated by Linda Winderter
26. Don’t Let Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems (Apparently we have A LOT of Mo Willems books checked out right now!)
27. Feelings by Aliki
28. The Littlest Viking by Alexandra Penfold, illustrated by Isabel Roxas
29. Giraffe’s Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae, illustrated by Guy Parker Reeves (One of my ALL-TIME favorites.)
30. Bayou Song by Margaret Simon, illustrated by Anna Cantrell, photography by Hency Cancienne (This one is the Louisiana selection for the children’s book program at the National Book Festival in Washington D.C.! I bought my copy straight from the author at our local SCBWI meet-up last week! Congrats, Margaret!)

My list of ‘important books’ will undoubtedly be different than yours, but the fact of the matter is, they’re important for a reason. In my head, there are two different types: the ones that were/are the standout favorites for each of our three kiddos, read and reread hundreds of times and the ones that we may not read often but are there when we need them for in the big moments of our lives. These past three weeks, we’ve read a lot of really important books.

For starters, we dug the old favorites out and gave them another read, paying attention to why they were favorites. Some were an easy, obvious answer. Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site is a charming read aloud, my boys love trucks and thanks to my husband’s work, we have no choice but to know the proper names for those big pieces of construction equipment. Others have tugged at one of those deep heartstrings and cause me to give the book a hug every time I read it. Nothing Is Better Than This was a gift when OC was born, and she and I have both always loved it for its beautiful love story, but especially the incredibly cool and independent female pirate character.

Aside from our trusty favorites, there are a couple of very important books we’ve borrowed from the library recently, most notably AFTER THE FALL and BOATS FOR PAPA (also IDA, ALWAYS from a couple weeks back.) You better believe that each of these books received a big ole’ book hug when we were finished. Everyone needs these books, regardless of age because the topics are so profound and universal (loss, grief and fear.) If you haven’t read them, I hope you do soon. (Disclaimer: you’ll need a box of tissue handy.) Many of our other books are mentor texts for projects I’m working on and topics I’m researching. Also, a healthy diet of ELEPHANT & PIGGIE is being devoured by MC, our emerging reader. As you can see, I’m not having a hard time keeping up with the reading, only the posting!

Stay tuned next week for another Paper People Interview, this one with Joy Keller of MONSTER TRUCKS! That’s all for now!

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!
-JP