Hooray for Halloweensie!

One of the most enjoyable parts of this writing community comes in the form of contests & challenges. This is my first year participating in Susanna Hill’s Halloweensie contest, but surely not my last. I’ve included a snippet from her blog, explaining the rules below. (Oh, I also borrowed the jack-o-lantern from her blog! I wanted to keep with the theme, you know?)

The Contest: write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (title not included in the 100 words), using the words candy corn, monster, and shadow. (Candy corn will be counted as 1 word.)  Your story can be scary, funny, or anything in between, poetry or prose, but it will only count for the contest if it includes those 3 words and is 100 words (you can go under, but not over!)  Get it?  Halloweensie – because it’s not very long and it’s for little people 🙂  (And yes, I know 100 words is short, but that’s part of the fun and the challenge!  We got nearly 150 fantastic entries last year, so I know you can do it!)  Also, you may use the words in any form – e.g. monsters, monstrous, shadowy, shadowed, whathaveyou 🙂  NO ILLUSTRATION NOTES PLEASE! (And yes, you may submit more than one entry if you’re so inclined 🙂 ) https://susannahill.com/2017/10/16/bic-folks-announcing-the-7th-annual-halloweensie-writing-contest-guidelines/  

And without further ado, I’d like to introduce you to…. (drumroll)

Candie’s Monster Shadows

Candie Corn was excited; it was her favorite night of the year!

She loved everything from costumes to yummy treats.

Her problem was the scary shadows.

This year will be different, she thought, putting on her costume. I’ll pretend they’re something else.

Later, when trick-or-treating was over, she headed home.

One shadow looked like a spider. “You’re just a hand,” she said, giving a wave.

The next resembled a bat, “but I’ll make you a butterfly!”

“And you’re not a monster you’re a monkey!” she giggled.

She tricked away every shadow until she was Home Treat Home.

 

I hope you’re all having fabulous fall weather! Best of luck to all the other Halloweensie participants. I can’t wait to read your fabulous posts!

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

 

Advertisements

Steering the Craft

It’s been a struggle of mine from the beginning.  I love to learn, I’ll soak up every chance I find to hone my skills and expand my knowledge on writing for children.  I keep hitting the same roadblocks, however, and in my most honest moment yet… the biggest one is cost.  I desperately want to learn from the greats.  I would devour any and every piece of wisdom that these prolifically published authors can share if only I could afford it.  You may or may not understand the struggle, but for me, it’s become quite the ‘hamster wheel’.  How am I ever going to find success as a picture book writer if I don’t learn more from those who’ve done it well?  How am I ever going to be able to afford these courses if I don’t sell (a few) books first? But, I can’t sell books that aren’t sellable, so I need to improve… but in order to improve, I need to find a way to afford the fees… and on, and on, and on.

My first venture into the picture book world came by way of a deeply discounted webinar package that included a copy of Ann Whitford Paul’s Writing Picture Books.  Since then I’ve remained on the hunt for the literary version of clearance rack deals: webinars offered at a discount, free courses and social media communities that offer guidance and expertise.  Truth be told, some of what I was hearing started feeling repetitive and I couldn’t help but feel that something big was missing from my toolbox though.  In a moment of clarity, I realized that I can hear the same lessons over and over and over again, taking something different from each… but only if my writing is good enough to handle the challenges.  I think I allowed myself to get so bogged down in writing the perfect picture book, that I jumped ahead of myself.  All my energy focused on the picture book end, and I am still missing key components of basic writing.

So, what do I do when I’m feeling down and discouraged? I take myself to the library!  Down at the very bottom of a shelf, taking up only a small section of space, I found the books on writing.  (Seems ironic to me, that in a building filled with writings, there were so few books on the topic, but I digress.)  I only had about ten options, and the attention span of my three cohorts was waning, so I quickly chose two and we checked out.  Fast forward to the following weekend and I realized that I held a gem in my hands.  One chapter in to Steering the Craft by Ursula K. le Guin and I ordered my own copy from Amazon. (On sale, no less!) I also stumbled upon an idea, and after sleeping on it and fleshing it out a bit, I created an online book study via Facebook.  There, a handful of critique partners, kindred spirits, new friends and I will take one chapter at a time, and reset our focus on basic writing skills.  (Are you interested? Email me or find me on Facebook if so… we start Oct 1!)

I think so highly of those who see a void and take actionable steps to fill it.  So, that’s what I’m trying to do with the book study, even if it’s only my own personal void.  I hope all the group members benefit from the book, I also hope we connect a bit more as a small community who can support each other on this journey. I have no doubt that my time and energy (and money) will be well spent, once I sharpen my skills a bit more. And there are numerous communities and opportunities out there at little/no cost to help writers along the way.  I’ve included a short list here of the ones I’ve found helpful… If you have other suggestions, I’d love to hear them!

  • Kid Lit College offers webinars for a small fee ($20-$40 range) and some have been incredibly helpful… one, in particular, ‘Be A Better Critique Partner’ by Heather Alexander I keep on repeat, for myself and my critiques.
  • On Facebook, a group called ‘Debut Picture Book Study’ takes one debut picture book each month and breaks it down and holds a discussion to help readers learn from it. I’ve not been able to participate as much as I’d like, but the conversations are enlightening and I’ve learned a good bit, even if from the fringes.
  • Susanna Hill’s blog is a treasure chest of all things Kid Lit, she runs many different series… ‘Would You Read it Wednesday’ is a great segment, that allows readers to submit their PB pitch and then allows other readers to comment/critique. Pitches are so important to the PB process and something I struggle with in a big way. I think I’m going to try… (update: I did it! I’m on the books for November 8!)
  • Podcasts! I’ve fallen in love with the wisdom these audio gems provide. I really need to start taking notes…
  • SCWBI’s webinar calendar offers a wide variety of topics and all are very well priced. I haven’t dug into these but I’m eager to do so.

I know there are other opportunities, some I’m not even familiar with yet (and some are going to be discussed in another post!) To wrap up, I want to include a quote from the Introduction of my new favorite book…

“A skill is something you know how to do.  Skill in writing frees you to write what you want to write…. Craft enables art.  There’s luck in art.  And there’s the gift.  You can’t earn that. But you can learn skill, you can earn it.  You can learn to deserve your gift… but first of all-it is an art, a craft, a making.  And that is the joy of it.  To make something well is to give yourself to it, to seek wholeness, to follow spirit.  To learn to make something well can take your whole life.  It’s worth it.”            

Ursula K. le Guin Steering the Craft: A 21st Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story 2015 edition, pg.xii

 

Here’s to leaning to deserve my gift, your gift, all our gifts.

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

PS- I have a couple of exciting interviews coming up! Stay tuned for the next couple of Tuesdays for an extra Let’s Talk posts (one of which is about a certain ‘PB How-To’ book I mentioned earlier!), and then soon after the October edition of Paper People with Liz Wong!

Twitter & Truths

I had a topic in mind for today’s post… #PitMad is this week and I am completely Twitter illiterate.  So, I was going to delve into the abyss of my Twitter knowledge and talk about the ‘140 character struggles of a wordy girl.’  But sometimes, and this week included, the words just won’t come, despite my intentions and best efforts.  At the eleventh hour, I didn’t even have 100 words.  If you write, then I know you know the struggle.  (The irony of it all isn’t lost on me… the fact that I can’t find enough words to write a post about my struggles with Twitter and its 140-character limit.)

Thankfully for my bloggers-block self, I did find inspiration in a different form this week, so if you’re interested, read on!  As a blogger of the ‘Aspiring Kid Lit Author’ variety, I know I’m not an original idea.  There are countless posts each week, from prolifically published authors, pre-published authors and everyone in between discussing their struggles, strategies, and successes. I love it and I consider myself blessed to be in good company.  Every now and then, a post or an interview comes through that’s refreshing in its honesty and its approach.  This week, the Kid Lit world was blessed by not one but two, and I can’t get enough of them.  If you haven’t checked out KidLit411’s Author Spotlight interview with Katey Howes, or 12×12’s Featured Author post by Anna Forrester, you are sorely missing out.  I’m lucky enough to have ‘met’ (in the polite, electronic form) both women.  They’ve been kind, encouraging, friendly and informative.  But in this interview and this post, they are both vulnerable, authentic, and real.  It’s always great to read about a books release and an author’s success, but maybe it’s even more helpful to know that even for the ones who seem to have it figured out are still sloshing about in slush piles, or adjusting their expectations.  I’ve been lapping up the wisdom that both authors have imparted on the rest of us and you should too!

And just to clarify… I do get the premise, I need a good, punchy pitch for my picture book manuscripts. I need to get my point across in a few words, saving enough for the necessary hashtags, and then hope to attract the interest of an agent.  I’m close, very close to sending out a round of queries.  I’m waiting on a couple of contests to announce their winners, and then I’m moving forward.  So #PitMad falls at a great time for me.  Maybe one of the agents from my shortlist will take notice, or maybe I’ll be introduced to someone I hadn’t had the chance to consider. Either way, that’s my mission for this week… I have three MS that are ‘ready’ and I get to tweet a pitch for each, three times. That’s nine tweets, with 18 hashtags and a total of 1,260 characters… whew, I just reread the instructions, just three tweetes total, can be for the same or different manuscripts.  Still, what am I hanging around here for? I have to get to work! See you later alligators!

Before I go, next week is the second installment of Paper People and I. Am. So. Excited. (Does it bother you when people add periods for emphasis?) But seriously, I had the chance to talk with Jason Kirschner, author/illustrator of Mr. Particular and the whole experience was a blast.  Please come back and check it out, I guarantee you’ll learn something and laugh a bit along the way.

 

Okay, that’s it. I’m really finished now.

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Week Nine!

We’ve started cashing in! Well it turns out we should have been doing that all summer long, but we started cashing in on Summer Reading prizes nonetheless. The theme is Building Better Readers, so my kids have made lego characters and filled tool boxes that are displayed on the wall.  We even had a silly and sweet pizza lunch yesterday thanks to the ‘Free Kids Buffet’ coupons they earned.  (Don’t worry, we started at the salad bar… which is good because we ended with chocolate pizza!)  My kids are proud of their accomplishments, and I’m just proud that I could see this challenge through.  Ten more books and we’ll hit our 100-book mark, and just in time because school starts next week.  We’ve strayed from the list a bit more, with OC asking for chapter books and my boys asking to ‘pick their own’.  I guess taking a stack from the hold shelf doesn’t hold the same appeal.  So, most of the list below are from Book Nerd Mommy’s 100 Picture Books for Your Summer Reading list, but the next ten are all ‘kids pick’.  Also, I have a fun celebration planned for next Wednesday, which happens to also be my birthday AND the last official day of summer. It’s going to be great.

  1. 1 Zany Zoo by Lori Degman & Colin Jack
  2. Flora the Flamingo by Molly Idle
  3. Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell & David Catrow
  4. Ninja by Aree Chung
  5. I’m Bored by Michael Ian Black & Debbie Ridpath Ohi
  6. More Pies by Robert Munsch & Michael Martchenko
  7. Where Are The Words? By Jodi McKay & Denise Holmes
  8. Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Pena & Christian Robinson
  9. The Napping House by Audrey Wood
  10. The Best Pirate by Sue Mongredien & Dan Taylor

Here’s the full list: http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

As I wind down my Wednesday posts with the challenge next week, I have one more ‘guest reviewer’ to introduce to you.  YC, as he’s known here, is a man of many aliases and can often be found wearing dingy white tube socks and someone else’s shoes.  He’s the entertainer of the bunch. Sitting on the brink of the magical age of four, he’s part toddler, part ‘big boy’ and all heart. YC provides countless laughs every day.  He quotes movies… appropriately in conversation, he’s the first to give hugs, smothers me with adorable kisses and is the proud owner of countless imaginary friends. (Toby is a dragon, Zack is a bear, and there’s a whole herd of ‘his kids’ that tag along too).

If I really get down to the bottom of who he is, inside that precious little body is a boy appropriately and adorably sure of himself, as only a ‘threenager’ can be.  He’s the one who likes to swing higher and driver faster, he possesses an on-point comedic timing and he doesn’t hesitate to stand up for himself (even to kids more than twice his age/size).  Something about his personality exudes a confidence and a calmness that is contagious.  When I find myself in the midst of a motherly-spiral, he gives me a hug, and I immediately start to calm down.  (If you read between the lines here, I just pointed out that like any good third born, he knows exactly how to work the system and when he needs to turn up the charm to stay on my good side. Did I mention that he’s funny?)  I asked YC what it was he likes most about reading.  He ‘loves when someone says the words to (him).’   I’m guessing that means while he’s sitting on their lap because he still fits perfectly there.  As the last line of the last book says, YC is “…the smallest, the bravest, (one of) the best.”

So that wraps up their time in the Magnolias spotlight and nearly wraps up our summer.  I hope you join me next week for numbers 91-100, and to hear how the four of us celebrate our success.  I also hope you’ll join me here Sunday, for the first of my Paper People interviews!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Let’s Talk, Maggie!

Today, I’m thrilled to share with my interview with Randi Lynn Mrvos whose debut picture book release is right around the corner. I hope you enjoy getting to know Randi & Maggie’s story as much as I have the past few months!

Randi, thanks so much for joining me here today.  This must be such an exciting time; your debut picture book Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell is only days away from its release.  Congratulations my friend!

I’ll start from the beginning, about six months ago, I found my way to your blog The Maggie Project.  I was just starting my own and was immediately drawn to you because of your medical background. (I found a kindred spirit!) Can you tell us all a little about yourself and how you changed course and started writing for children?  I loved creative writing in high school, but my parents wanted me to get a degree in the medical field.  After I graduated college, I got a job as a Medical Technologist at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and worked in the clinical laboratory for over twenty years.  I didn’t think about writing until our daughter was born.  Every night before bedtime, my husband and I read picture books to her.  These books awoke a long-buried desire to be creative and to write again.

Was Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell the first picture book manuscript you wrote?  Actually, I had written five picture book manuscripts before Maggie.  And, there have been several more manuscripts written after Maggie.  Many of my stories won prizes, and I thought that would make a good selling point.  But it takes more than winning contests to get published.  Publishers want to fall head-over-heels in love with the character, the voice, and the plot of a story.

When you were starting out, what resources did you use to learn about the writing process and improve your craft? What are the best tools you have in your tool box now?  When I got serious about writing, I took a class at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in my hometown Lexington, Kentucky.  For one of our projects, we had to write a children’s book.  My first book was called “Are We There Yet?”  I actually believed that after one writing class that my first story would get published.  So naïve.  But those rejections were a wake-up call.  I needed to learn more about writing picture books and the publishing industry.  So, I became a member of SCBWI, read writer’s magazines, attended writer’s conferences and workshops and studied picture books as well as books on the craft of writing for children.

Two of my favorite writing books are Children’s Writer’s Word Book by Alijandra Mogilner and Writing Picture Books by Ann Whitford Paul.

Oh, I love Ann Whitford Paul’s book! One of my critique partners refers to it as the ‘Picture Book Bible’. I need to get my hands on the Children’s Writer’s Word Book now. 

Since the day our paths crossed you’ve been an incredible mentor to me. Were there specific people who helped you at the beginning of your journey?  Who do you look up to now, as a kid lit writer?  I know from firsthand experience how hurtful it can be when published writers refuse to lend a helping hand.  I am flattered that writers seek me out, so I’m eager to reach out and encourage others.

My husband Jim is the biggest influence in my life.  In fact, he is my editor.  Jim often tells me I am off to a good start (which is a nice way to say the story needs more work).

There are four people to whom I look up to and admire.  My creative director and editor Melissa Carrigee has guided me throughout the publishing process.  Editor Chuck Sambuchino advocated the importance of getting an agent.  Award-winning author Evelyn Christensen has been a generous, graceful and kind-hearted friend and Mary Kole gave me spot-on editorial advice.

Now, let’s focus on Maggie!! When I started following you, you had just reopened the site.  After deciding to shelve The Maggie Project, you took a five-year hiatus.  It appears Maggie took the scenic route to publication.  Can you tell us a little about your journey with this book?  What was it that made you pull her off the shelf and try again?  I shelved Maggie because it was rejected by 50 publishers.  I began other writing projects and focused on a story about Parisian carousel pony called Rosie.  But it was déjà vu all over again.  Rosie was repeatedly rejected.  I was frustrated and wanted to understand how to get out of this rut, so I hired editorial consultant Mary Kole.  She offered to take a look at Rosie and three query letters.  I pulled out the query for Maggie.  That prompted me to re-read the story.  I was surprised to find that I still liked it.  But the publishing industry had changed since Maggie was written.  Long picture books were a thing of the past, and because Maggie was close to 1000 words long, 500 words needed to be cut if I ever entertained the thought of submitting the story again.  I decided it would be a good writing exercise to see if I could edit the piece.  Afterward, I liked the story even better.  I sent Mary the query letter for Maggie, two additional queries, and the story about Rosie.  Mary’s remarks encouraged me to submit Maggie again (and now, Rosie sits on a shelf!)

Can you tell us about the day you got ‘The Call?’  Those are my favorite kind of stories! The “call” was actually an email.  Last November, my husband and I decided to celebrate our birthdays in New Orleans.   Two weeks before leaving, Maggie was submitted to five publishers.  Before we left I received a rejection, but I wasn’t going to let that ruin our celebration.  While in NOLA, I was dying to get my fortune read by a psychic in Jackson Square.  She invited me to sit at her table.  She asked me to choose a crystal gem and three cards and then make three wishes (One of the wishes was to get a book published.)  After studying the gem and the cards, she told me to expect good things.  The very next evening before dinner, I checked my messages.  There was a curious email.  Surprisingly, it was from an agent.  She had written:  I like your book!  Sometimes, wishes really do come true.

Ohhh, that’s a fabulous New Orleans story and a wonderful birthday surprise! I bet the Crescent City has a special place for you now.  If you ever visit again you must let me know!

We’ve talked some about your experience working with an illustrator.  You were able to help with the final selection, which I think is incredible! What was it like seeing Maggie and the other characters come to life?  Working with a small press like Cactus Moon Publications has many benefits.  One of the benefits was having the incredible opportunity to “audition” illustrators.  I chose the amazingly talented Emiliano Billai.  When I first saw Maggie, my heart melted.  It was like seeing a newborn child for the first time.  It was incredible!  Emiliano was able to interpret the text and capture Maggie’s personality.

Randi is also the editor or an online magazine for kids called Kids Imagination Train.  I’m curious, do you think your experience as editor of the e-zine helped you along your publishing journey?  Can you elaborate a little about KIT and your work there? Being an editor has helped me grow as a writer because I read a lot of submissions and have learned to recognize the strengths and weakness in manuscripts.

Kid’s Imagination Train was conceived to encourage kids to read and learn as well as to offer writers a market for their work.  We have book reviews, fiction, poetry, puzzles, and nonfiction for kids ages 5 – 12.  KIT is unique in that it engages children by providing them the opportunity to draw for the magazine and to have their pictures published online.  We even have an audio page where children may listen to their favorite features!  How cool is that?  Our little magazine is remarkable.  Everyone on the staff donates their time and talents so we can keep the magazine free for kids.

The cover of the latest issue makes me want to jump headfirst into a swimming pool! My daughter is hard at work on the Body Parts crossword puzzle too.

What’s been the most surprising thing you’ve learned during the publishing process? When writers work with a small press, they must do a lot of promotion.  I knew this was required, but I was surprised how much time and hard work was involved.  In the beginning, I was clueless and scared—I had never marketed a book before.  But with the guidance of the creative director and by researching how others promote their books, I began to understand what was needed to develop an exciting and unique marketing plan.

I’ve had a blast as a member of your book launch team for the past few weeks!  What are your plans moving forward?  After the book is released in August, it will be time to contact the local news media, schedule book signings and reading engagements, apply to book festivals, and coordinate with animal advocacy groups.  Meeting and greeting fans is what I look forward to the most.

And I thought it best to end with a fun one, there’s a dog in your story… so if you could be any dog (or breed of dog) for a day, which one and why? You know, I’m actually a cat person…but if I could be a dog it would be a basenji.  Never heard of the basenji?  It’s a barkless dog (though it growls, whimpers and whines).  The basenji is intelligent and stubborn.

So when is Maggie’s official book birthday (release date)?  And where can readers find you on social media?  There is no official date yet, but we’re expecting the book to be released in August.

You can learn more about Randi and Maggie at  http://www.randilynnmrvos.com and http://themaggieproject.blogspot.com

Thanks again for joining us today!!  On Tuesday, August 1, I’ll have a guest blog on Randi’s OTHER website, Children’s Writers World where I’ll talk a little about my own manuscript, and the best writing advice I’ve ever received. (Guess who it came from?)

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

 

Weeks Seven & Eight

Maybe I can blame it on the heat.  Surely the humidity is high enough around here to stifle whatever creativity is left out.  Could it be that my creative energy is spent on my kiddos, having them home? There’s also a good chance I let myself slip out of my routine. Whatever the case may be, I hit a writing wall in the past couple of weeks and I’m doing my darndest to plow through it… But. It’s. Just. So. HOT.

I am happy to report that we haven’t lost any #100PictureBookSummer steam, even though I did skip last week.  I had a good reason, I promise. I’m going to catch up here, listing weeks seven and eight and reveling in the fact that we are only 20 books away from reaching our summer reading goal!  I’ve included the link to Book Nerd Mommy’s full list below.  I always make a few adjustments but it’s been a wonderful guide for me these past few weeks.  Here’s number 61-80…

http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

  1. Billy and Goat at the State Fair by Dan Yaccarino
  2. Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
  3. Have you Seen Elephant? by David Barros
  4. Louise Loves Art by Kelly Light
  5. The Adventures of Beekle: the Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat
  6. The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
  7. Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova by Laurel Snyder & Julie Morstad
  8. The Summer Nick Taught his Cats to Read by Curtis Manley & Kate Berube
  9. Extra Yarn by Mac Barnette & John Klassen
  10. Hannah Hashimoto Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegake & Qin Leng
  11. If you Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff & Felicia Bond
  12. On the Night You Were Born by Nancy Tillman
  13. The Branch by Pierre Pratt & Mireille Messier
  14. Quackers by Liz Fleming
  15. The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn & Ruth E Harper
  16. I’m Bored by Christine Schneider & Herve Pinel
  17. The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak
  18. The Bear’s Song by Benjamin Chaud
  19. Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs as retold by Mo Willems
  20. In My Heart: a Book of Feelings by Jo Witek & Christine Roussey

Two posts back, I talked a lot about OC.  This week, I’d like to introduce you a little more to MC.  At five years old, he’s proud to have the lightest hair in the family (still brown), wears his heart on his sleeves (both) and does everything in his little life with so much passion.  Don’t mistake the passion for speed though, he’s only in a hurry when he wants to be.  MC’s life is one leisurely stroll through the park, with periodic bursts of energy interspersed with ninja moves and three-hour meals that would make a Parisian antsy. He is my self-proclaimed bodyguard, a fantastic story teller and the most enthusiastic audience you’ll ever meet. I spent most of my life hoping and wishing for a son, he is one helluva an answer to a deeply rooted prayer.

If my journey as a writer has an impact on any of my kids, its MC that I think it will affect the most.  Yes, OC loves to read and has a voracious literary appetite, but unfortunately for her, she reads like her mother… quickly and sometimes the details get lost.  MC has a keen ability to hone in on a story, and soak it in with an attentiveness and understanding that doesn’t come naturally to most kids his age.  He’s also at that magical place of learning to read.  He loves sounding words out and talking about letters.  He’s on the cusp of establishing his own relationship with the written word, and it’s a beautiful thing for a mother to watch.  The icing on the cake is when he uses sentences like “One day, I’ll write a book about…”, or “This will make a great book one day…” or “One day, when I’m a writer…” and my heart skips a beat.

Depending on his mood, he could say that almost all the books listed above are his favorite. I know he means it, too.  He loves the experience of being read to, he loves the words on the page and I think most of all he loves getting lost in a story.  Stay tuned, as our summer reading wraps up I’ll introduce you to YC…he’s the funny one!

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Week Six

I’m afraid my adorable guest reviewers have left me high and dry this week.  Well, that’s not technically true since it’s been raining every day, but regardless, I’m solo.  I can’t blame them though, spending a week at the farm, swimming, picking watermelons and chasing bunnies does sound like a lot of fun.  Thankfully I didn’t lose momentum without them, (let’s be honest, I’m doing this for me anyway!)  I think this is one of the best groups of books yet.  I substituted a couple from the list with some books I needed for other projects, and they were a wonderful fit.  Strategically, or coincidentally placed throughout Book Nerd Mommy’s list (see link at the bottom for the full list) are wordless picture books, this week was no exception.  Journey was a beautiful story about the power of creativity, color and imagination.  Maybe Something Beautiful had a similar theme and was based on true events.  Journey: Based off of OR7 The Most Famous Wolf in the West was also based on true events, and was written by a debut picture book author.  Let Me Finish was also written by a debut author, and I’m pretty sure was based off of the events of my everyday life… okay not really, but its adorable and I completely empathize with the struggle!

This probably doesn’t come as much of a surprise, but I’ve been trying to educate myself on the ins and outs of debut authors. Your only ‘debut’ once, and we all hope to be there one day, right?  This desire has been exacerbated (nursing word!) by participating on a book launch team, and seeing some of the behind the scenes goodness.  Little (or widely) known fact: Authors are responsible for the majority of their books marketing.  Some publishing houses even want a written marketing plan from their authors.  It seems prudent to me, to learn as much as I can, while writing as much as I can, and reading as much as I can.  That’s it folks, one day if I make it big, that’s the advice I’ll share… Read. Write. Learn. Always and Often.  I’ll be the guinea pig and let you know how it turns out! Here’s the list of books from this week and a link to Book Nerd Mommy’s full list of 100 Picture Books for Your Summer Reading.

  1. Let Me Finish! by Minh Le & Isabel Roxas
  2. Maybe Something Beautiful by F. Isabel Campony, Theresa Howell & Rafael Lopez
  3. Journey by Aaron Becker
  4. Journey: Based On the True Story of OR7 the Most Famous Wolf in the West by Emma Bland Smith & Robin James
  5. Put Me in a Zoo by Robert Lopshire
  6. They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenxzel
  7. If I Had A Gryphon by Vikki Vansickle & Cale Atkinson
  8. Billy and Goat at the State Fair by Dan Yaccarion
  9. The Adventures of Beekle by Dan Santat
  10. City Shapes by Diana Murray & Bryan Collier

You’ll be happy to know that I did complete my homework from Sunday, and even turned it in early…Writing in first person, it was more fun than I thought! Also, stay tuned later this month, I’m interviewing Randy Lynn Mrvos, editor of Kids Imagination Train and author of Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show and Tell just days before the books big release!

Here’s the link I promised you!

http://www.booknerdmommy.com/100-picture-books-summer-reading/

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

July

July has arrived, with all her sweltering heat and mighty mosquitoes.   As a family, this is often the month where we take a collective sigh and settle in for the second half of summer.  School starts in early August in these parts, so this is our calm before the school year storm.  As a writer, my month will be full and fun… here’s a little of what I have going on.

  • WOW Nonficpic (July 10-14) is an online seminar on writing non-fiction picture books hosted by Children’s Author, Kristen Fulton. I’m a history buff, and a science nerd so the thought of expanding my writing skill set to include non-fiction books is very exciting.  For more info, http://www.kristenfulton.org/
  • I’m working on an author interview series that will begin here, on Magnolias and Manuscripts next month. I’m not ready to discuss all the nitty gritty details yet, but it will involve debut picture book authors and it’s going to be great! Stay tuned!
  • #PBHOT62 (http://www.renatraxel.com/literacy–art/summer-reading-challenge-for-picture-book-writers) is an exciting opportunity that I signed up for, but I think I bit off more than I can chew. Rena Traxel, librarian and children’s writer put together a fun and interactive challenge to encourage picture book writers to read more picture books.  Each day, for the next 62, participants will post pictures of themselves from her list of suggestions, reading a different picture book.  I thought it would fit in nicely with our #100PictureBookSummer, but I just don’t know that I can manage 62 posts, because…. drumroll….
  • The most exciting thing going on for me this month… I’ve been asked to be a part of a book launch team! I mentioned Randi Mrvos in an earlier post, she’s been a kind and generous mentor for me and I’m very excited to return the favor and help to introduce the world to her ‘Maggie’.  If you follow me on Instagram, Twitter or are a Facebook friend of mine, you’ll see daily posts starting tomorrow to help spread the word about her book debut which happens this August.  (I even get an ARC to review!  You’ll definitely hear more about that here.) To learn more about Maggie check out her journey at http://themaggieproject.blogspot.com/

Blame it on the heat… or the holiday, but that’s all I have for today.  I hope everyone has a wonderful and safe Independence Day.  Here’s to the land of the free, home of the brave.

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Tie your rafts.

I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, “I’d be lost without my critique group” or “my critique partners got me to where I am today”.  What’s a critique partner you ask?  It’s how we say ‘friend’ in kid lit-anese.  Trust me when I say, a writer in this world is nothing without them.  Tying your raft to a good and trusted partner, or an active and engaged group is the difference between floating alone in the Kid Lit ocean or floating with others, who bring drinks, chips, and dip and maybe even a karaoke machine.  You’re all still floating, but tied together will be much more fun!  It’s the strangest thing, sitting patiently while a good friend takes a red ball point pen to your latest creation, and magically, in the end, everyone wins.

Let me back up a little bit.  Only a couple of months back, I felt like the most eager, but isolated writer on the planet.  I shared here, many times, about my struggle to find my place in the community.  Then as the weeks passed, connections were made.   Some happened thanks to blogs, this one or others.  Different forms of social media have played a role, and as always seems to happen, the world grew smaller and connections bloomed from right under my own nose.  If you’re reading this and feeling like you’re bobbing alone, missing out on the party, I’d love to share some of the places I’ve met friends.

  • Facebook, seems obvious but there are so many groups it can be daunting. Some are active, others are not.  Some allow for good news to be shared, others only allow for questions to be asked and craft to be discussed.  I’ve found a critique group through Facebook, and there’s also a steady stream of blog posts and interviews that appear, always filled with new and exciting authors, or advice from the more seasoned ones.  This is really the best place to build a community.
  • Instagram is filled with book reviews and ‘beyond the book’ activities. It seems like each day there are one hundred book reviews, new and old.  Publishing houses post here too.
  • Twitter… sigh, I have an account now, but I still don’t really get it. I have heard that this is THE place to get info from agents and editors, and all around general kid lit news.   Using things like #MSWL (manuscript wish list) you can find out firsthand what they are all searching for and get a feel for whether you would be a good fit.
  • The Writers Match. This is a fantastic website that offers all the benefits of social media without the drama/excess.  The Writers Match is a place to help writers find critique partners, which hopefully turn into long and fruitful friendships.  You’re able to create a small bio, select what genre you’re interested in critiquing (anything you want is there, way more than just kid lit) and send private messages back and forth. I’ve had a wonderful experience since joining. thewritersmatch.com
  • Blogs! This is what’s always exciting for me because it’s the reason Magnolias was created.  I was in search of a community and convinced that others were out there too.  I’m fortunate enough to have crossed paths and connected with a few of them, and I’d like to introduce you to their sites as a way of saying thank you.  We have a lot of similarities between us, but we are all in different stages of this journey.

https://meganhaslemjones.wordpress.com/ Megan and I are kindred spirits, who met through NaPiBoWriWee.  We live on opposite ends of the country, but I’m convinced we were next door neighbors in a previous life, living in a cute little cul de sac with a certain other someone (*cough*Jody *cough*) living in between and balancing us out.

https://julielacombeauthor.wordpress.com/ I am lucky enough to be in the same critique group as Julie.  We quickly discovered that our writing styles are similar and personally we have a lot in common.  She even has a Cajun connection!  Our journeys started around the same time and continue to mirror each others I hope this doesn’t change.

http://www.patriciasaunders.com/ About ten years ago, I spent part of two summers living with my aunt and helping at a camp for gifted kids that Patricia was teaching at.  Fast forward to current day, and unbeknownst to be, she’s chasing a similar dream.  That same aunt helped me reconnect with her and she’s taken me under her wing and nudged me in the right direction on more than one occasion.  Her debut picture book, and a second, will hit bookstore shelves soon!

And finally, http://themaggieproject.blogspot.com/  Randi was probably one of the first connections I made and has been a gracious mentor and friend.  Her debut picture book is due out this summer!! You can learn more about Maggie, and her journey to publication at the link posted.  Randi has a couple of other websites, including an e-magazine that she publishes. They’ve all been filled with great information. I’m honored to be a part of her book launch team next month! Stay tuned for more!

This is surely not a list of everyone’s path I’ve been fortunate enough to cross, but they are all wonderful writers who I’m lucky to call friends.  If you have a moment, check out their websites and read their take on this wonderful journey.  As always, I appreciate you spending time here.

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

-JP

Happy Birthday-ish!

This week I’ll celebrate a birthday of sorts.  Not my actual birthday, though today is my sisters …Happy Birthday, AC! But this coming Thursday, June 15 will mark one year, to the day, that my first picture book manuscript was written.  I had been struggling with the desire to write for years, although at times I couldn’t identify the urge.  I started with a novel.  Eesh… then for a while most of my reading was Lifestyle/Parenting Blogs… I tried my hand at that too.  It took me entirely too long to realize that I was completely avoiding the genre that called out the loudest to me.  If I’m honest, I probably ignored the internal call to write picture books for six months before acquiescing myself to the idea. Even then I waited for the inspiration but to bite. Then one day, while traveling home from a business trip, enjoying the summer sunshine and the quiet car… BAM… it happened and Nathan’s story was born.  In fact, I remember being so overwhelmed with excitement and inspiration that I started talking out loud to myself and did so for the rest of the drive home.  For the next few days, I was completely preoccupied with the story, until I finally sat down and on June 15 put in on paper.  The preoccupation hasn’t lessened, and my desire to write has only grown.  It’s been a wonderful year. It’s been a stressful year.  I’ve been fortunate to make some exciting connections and have bigger, more exciting adventures on the horizon.

I love the original draft of Nathan’s story, and I can still recite it in its entirety.  I’m not exaggerating when I tell you that it could be a poster child for’ Everything You Shouldn’t Do When You Write a Picture Book’.  I literally made every mistake in the book.  The ones I didn’t make, I can promise you I made in the second draft.  The Original, as I’ve affectionately named it, rhymed with no reason or method to it, opened with a terrible cliché, had almost no conflict, and his mother was the protagonist.  It held no character development, no story arc, a preachy-theme and too many words.  It was a hot mess.  Thankfully I’ve learned a lot, though I still do love the mess.  What I love more, however, is where the story stands now.

My birthday present to myself, and to Nathan is a contest.  Rate Your Story, a website that allows its members to submit stories to editors and authors for feedback, hosts an annual contest open to members and non-members alike.  (I’m not a member, but I’ve love to hear from you if you are!) The 2017 RYS contest opens for entries from July 15th-July 31st and I do believe he’s grown up enough to enter.  I’ve enjoyed the experience of sending my kids off to school for the first time, and I hope this contest is no different.  I have a month to make sure his uniform fits, his hair is trimmed and there’s no food on his face.   My opener is cute, there are no rhymes, he is his own hero and I finished in just under 500 words.  His mom only makes a cameo and no longer has any speaking lines, though his younger sister shines in a lovable supporting role. He’s met two freelance editors, and been through eight different critique partners! It’s not always easy to read feedback on my work, but I’m so grateful for every bit that I’ve received.  I think my boy is as ready as he’ll ever be.

Another thing I’m treating myself to this summer is learning more about the world of Non-Fiction Picture Book writing.  As a science and history buff, it seems obvious that I would enjoy this style of writing but I’ve not yet exposed myself to this side of the industry.  Thanks to some guidance and encouragement, I’m signed up for a weeklong on-line seminar called WOW-NonFicPic, hosted by Kristen Fulton.  This will almost certainly be something I expound upon here as I learn more… that’s the point of all this blogging, after all.  I’ve included the link to both the contest and the seminar below in case you want more information.

https://rateyourstory.blogspot.com/p/writing-contest.html

http://www.kristenfulton.org/wow-nonficpic.html

 

Thanks for reading, come back anytime!

JP